Exile Bibliophile

Adventures in Book Collecting

bookpatrol:

Mining newspapers for poetry 

What to do you get when you partner up a digital humanities projects librarian with an associate professor of computer science and engineering?

Answer: Something good.

At the University of Nebraska Elizabeth Lorang, research assistant professor and digital humanities projects librarian in the University Libraries has teamed with Leen-Kiat Soh, associate professor of the computer science and engineering, and a couple of students students to develop software to recognize poetry from digitized newspapers.

“Millions of poems were published in newspapers. Looking at them will shift the way we understand poetry in the United States.” says Lorang.

Similar to text-mining applications, where specific words and phrases are mined from digital sources, the goal of the image processing computer program is to locate specific images or outlines of images. The idea traces back to Lorang’s doctoral dissertation project, when she spent 18 months scouring old newspapers for poems. She was only able to catalog 3,000 poems in that time, but she noticed that the poems were often easily recognizable when looking at the whole page at once.

In steps Leen-Kiat Soh who views this as” a big data problem” and off they go.

Says Lorang:

If we think about the massive digital libraries that we’re creating, the tradition has been to use the text that’s created in those processes to enable us to discover content, but at the same time we’re creating digital images. If we don’t do anything with those digital images, we’re missing a lot of the potential of the digital libraries

On the other side of the pond, Andrew Hobbs and Claire Januszewski from the University of Central Lancashire have been keeping a blog focusing on poetry found in nineteenth -century newspapers. The blog, the local press as poetry publisher, 1800-1900, is centered around the hypothesis that “the national network of local newspapers was the largest publisher of nineteenth-century poetry, and the medium through which most encounters with poetry occurred.”

Great stuff.

More on the project:

Project mines 8 million news pages for poetry | University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Hooray for poetry!

Generally speaking, books don’t cause much harm. Except when you read them, that is. Then they cause all kinds of problems.

—Pseudonymous Bosch (via observando)

(via bookoisseur)

They’re not like compact discs or even phonograph records. These are things that had their day and they were replaced. You can say that you’ve seen the same progression with books in that e-books have a lot of nice bells and whistles. But the big difference is that audio recordings of music have only been around for, I’m going to say, 120 years at the most. Books have been around for three, four centuries. There’s a deeply implanted desire and understanding and wanting of books, of needing books, that isn’t there with music. It’s a deeper well of human experience.

—Stephen King (via vintageanchorbooks)

harley-reads:

Such an awesome book. 

Mine sits, still wrapped in plastic, taunting me. I think I’ve officially decided to keep it for winter.

harley-reads:

Such an awesome book. 

Mine sits, still wrapped in plastic, taunting me. I think I’ve officially decided to keep it for winter.

(via bookoisseur)

books-cupcakes:

feministfangirl:

rhibot:

vampyyra:

vegantine:

sykobabbul:

huffpostbooks:

What’s Your Book Shelfie Style?

This post turns me on.

Topic

Topic and size.

Colour pleased me but it’s usually topic and then within topic, size. 

topic, then alphabetical, with a side of stacked. i do not have enough bookshelves.

Topic, then size, then stacked.

Fiction/Poetry: Author nationality and chronological by author within that.

NonFiction: Subject, then chronological within those (I have lots of history books).

(via bookoisseur)

Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women for the money. And it made her miserable.

As a young writer, Alcott concentrated on lurid pulp stories of revenge, murder, and adultery–“blood and thunder” literature, as she called i–and enjoyed writing very much. She was in her mid 30s when an editor suggested she try writing a book for girls. Alcott wasn’t very interested, but her father was a complete moron with money and had left the family in terrible financial trouble. Alcott wrote Little Women in hopes of some decent sales and a little breathing room and got way more than she asked for. The money in sequels was too good to turn down (and her father didn’t get any smarter with a dime), but Alcott hated writing what she called “moral pap for the young” and longed to return to the smut and violence of her early endeavors.

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

See all of our posts with GIFS

-Laura H.

huntingtonlibrary:

SHARK WEEK!!!!!
caption: John Hovey, Journal of a voyage from Newburyport, Mass. to San Francisco, Cal. in the Brig Charlotte, 1849, ink and watercolor. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. GIFed by The Huntington.

huntingtonlibrary:

SHARK WEEK!!!!!

caption: John Hovey, Journal of a voyage from Newburyport, Mass. to San Francisco, Cal. in the Brig Charlotte, 1849, ink and watercolor. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. GIFed by The Huntington.

jacquesdor:

oorequiemoo:

wasbella102:

Another of Pablo Neruda’s writing spaces in Chile, from Alastair Reid’s book “Pablo Neruda: Absence and Presence”


Voilà,  ça c’est exactement l’image de mon rêve le plus fou : avoir une table au ras de la mer pour y poser mon envie d’écrire et mes petits carnets… loin de tout si possible. Vous avez ça pour moi ?  Si oui… je vous réponds aussitôt, je deviens votre ami pour la vie, je vous épouse s’il le faut, je vous aime pour toujours… et au-delà … :-)

jacquesdor:

oorequiemoo:

wasbella102:

Another of Pablo Neruda’s writing spaces in Chile, from Alastair Reid’s book “Pablo Neruda: Absence and Presence”

Voilà,  ça c’est exactement l’image de mon rêve le plus fou : avoir une table au ras de la mer pour y poser mon envie d’écrire et mes petits carnets… loin de tout si possible.
Vous avez ça pour moi ? 
Si oui… je vous réponds aussitôt, je deviens votre ami pour la vie, je vous épouse s’il le faut, je vous aime pour toujours… et au-delà … :-)

(via jbrookspress)

Christopher Morley #autoreblog

Christopher Morley #autoreblog

(Source: hispine)