Exile Bibliophile

Adventures in Book Collecting
harley-reads:

Such an awesome book. 

Mine sits, still wrapped in plastic, taunting me. I think I’ve officially decided to keep it for winter.

harley-reads:

Such an awesome book. 

Mine sits, still wrapped in plastic, taunting me. I think I’ve officially decided to keep it for winter.

(via bookoisseur)

books-cupcakes:

feministfangirl:

rhibot:

vampyyra:

vegantine:

sykobabbul:

huffpostbooks:

What’s Your Book Shelfie Style?

This post turns me on.

Topic

Topic and size.

Colour pleased me but it’s usually topic and then within topic, size. 

topic, then alphabetical, with a side of stacked. i do not have enough bookshelves.

Topic, then size, then stacked.

Fiction/Poetry: Author nationality and chronological by author within that.

NonFiction: Subject, then chronological within those (I have lots of history books).

(via bookoisseur)

Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women for the money. And it made her miserable.

As a young writer, Alcott concentrated on lurid pulp stories of revenge, murder, and adultery–“blood and thunder” literature, as she called i–and enjoyed writing very much. She was in her mid 30s when an editor suggested she try writing a book for girls. Alcott wasn’t very interested, but her father was a complete moron with money and had left the family in terrible financial trouble. Alcott wrote Little Women in hopes of some decent sales and a little breathing room and got way more than she asked for. The money in sequels was too good to turn down (and her father didn’t get any smarter with a dime), but Alcott hated writing what she called “moral pap for the young” and longed to return to the smut and violence of her early endeavors.

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

See all of our posts with GIFS

-Laura H.

huntingtonlibrary:

SHARK WEEK!!!!!
caption: John Hovey, Journal of a voyage from Newburyport, Mass. to San Francisco, Cal. in the Brig Charlotte, 1849, ink and watercolor. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. GIFed by The Huntington.

huntingtonlibrary:

SHARK WEEK!!!!!

caption: John Hovey, Journal of a voyage from Newburyport, Mass. to San Francisco, Cal. in the Brig Charlotte, 1849, ink and watercolor. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. GIFed by The Huntington.

jacquesdor:

oorequiemoo:

wasbella102:

Another of Pablo Neruda’s writing spaces in Chile, from Alastair Reid’s book “Pablo Neruda: Absence and Presence”


Voilà,  ça c’est exactement l’image de mon rêve le plus fou : avoir une table au ras de la mer pour y poser mon envie d’écrire et mes petits carnets… loin de tout si possible. Vous avez ça pour moi ?  Si oui… je vous réponds aussitôt, je deviens votre ami pour la vie, je vous épouse s’il le faut, je vous aime pour toujours… et au-delà … :-)

jacquesdor:

oorequiemoo:

wasbella102:

Another of Pablo Neruda’s writing spaces in Chile, from Alastair Reid’s book “Pablo Neruda: Absence and Presence”

Voilà,  ça c’est exactement l’image de mon rêve le plus fou : avoir une table au ras de la mer pour y poser mon envie d’écrire et mes petits carnets… loin de tout si possible.
Vous avez ça pour moi ? 
Si oui… je vous réponds aussitôt, je deviens votre ami pour la vie, je vous épouse s’il le faut, je vous aime pour toujours… et au-delà … :-)

(via jbrookspress)

Christopher Morley #autoreblog

Christopher Morley #autoreblog

(Source: hispine)

benjaminlclark:

****Paper Notebook that Syncs to Cloud****
I’ve been using *those* notebooks (you know the ones) for several years now … little ones as everyday carry for all the random stuff, and bigger ones as an appointment diary and a place to stick my fruit stickers. I love using notebooks, and they are indispensable to my creativity and productivity. But it’s not only the simple, analog process of pencil to paper. Occasionally, I pull old notebooks off the shelf to look for old ideas and new inspiration. Or just to enjoy the satisfaction of having a lovely stack of filled notebooks with the squiggles of my brain guano.
Enter Mod Notebooks — Paper and ink notebooks (that don’t cost all that much more than *those other* notebooks) and once it’s filled, you send your notebook to their idea fairy-archivists, and they scan it, sync it to your account on their app on your phone and VOILA — there it is! Mod will then return your notebook to you, or it can be recycled (*GASP/ CLUTCH AT THROAT*).
No more being away from your chicken scratch archive, no more saying “I know the name of that song, I wrote it down in my notebook last week [three years/ eleven notebooks ago] …”, etc. They claim the app also syncs with your favorite productivity computer thingy (Hooray for OneNote!). I didn’t know I wanted that feature until they offered.
Now if they’d just scan all my old notebooks ….
Okay, so not only is this a cool new thing I heard about, but Huckberry has a deal right now that’ll save us about $5 on this very good idea, so I for one am going to try it out.
(via Mod Notebook - Ruled | Huckberry)

benjaminlclark:

****Paper Notebook that Syncs to Cloud****

I’ve been using *those* notebooks (you know the ones) for several years now … little ones as everyday carry for all the random stuff, and bigger ones as an appointment diary and a place to stick my fruit stickers. I love using notebooks, and they are indispensable to my creativity and productivity. But it’s not only the simple, analog process of pencil to paper. Occasionally, I pull old notebooks off the shelf to look for old ideas and new inspiration. Or just to enjoy the satisfaction of having a lovely stack of filled notebooks with the squiggles of my brain guano.

Enter Mod Notebooks — Paper and ink notebooks (that don’t cost all that much more than *those other* notebooks) and once it’s filled, you send your notebook to their idea fairy-archivists, and they scan it, sync it to your account on their app on your phone and VOILA — there it is! Mod will then return your notebook to you, or it can be recycled (*GASP/ CLUTCH AT THROAT*).

No more being away from your chicken scratch archive, no more saying “I know the name of that song, I wrote it down in my notebook last week [three years/ eleven notebooks ago] …”, etc. They claim the app also syncs with your favorite productivity computer thingy (Hooray for OneNote!). I didn’t know I wanted that feature until they offered.

Now if they’d just scan all my old notebooks ….

Okay, so not only is this a cool new thing I heard about, but Huckberry has a deal right now that’ll save us about $5 on this very good idea, so I for one am going to try it out.

(via Mod Notebook - Ruled | Huckberry)

(via benjaminlclark)

FACT: If you love books, you should already be following Book Traces.

booktraces:

"… but [he] was a few minutes afterwards, killed in the vineyard immediately adjoining it. I trust that what I have written will prove sufficient for your purpose," writes the Confederate general officer Basil W. Duke to Chattanooga attorney, Charles McGuffey, in an account of the death of his brother-in-law, General John Hunt Morgan

As submitter Steve Cox writes, “This book is part of a collection of books given the university in the early 1950s by a local collector of Southern imprints, and who was noted for inserting items in her books, such as news clippings, letters, notes. Included in this is a carte de visite, pasted in of John Hunt Morgan, and tipped in the back is [the] 1916 letter … Unfortunately, the book was processed back in the day before rare and valuable books got any special treatment.”

Title: Reminiscences of General Basil W. Duke, C. S. A.
Author: Duke, Basil Wilson
Publication date: Garden City, 1911
Library: University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Call number: E470 .D89 1911
Submitted by: Steve Cox

[Read a rather gripping account of Morgan’s death here: Footnotes on the Death of John Morgan]