Exile Bibliophile

Adventures in Book Collecting

Expired by Kerry Mansfield

Statement:

In elementary school I spent many lost afternoons hiding in the library nook reading while settled deeply into a green vinyl beanbag chair surrounded by the scent of musty paper. The first rite of passage upon learning how to write one’s name was to inscribe it on a library check-out card promising the book’s safe journey and return. I remember reading the list of names that had come before me and cradling the feeling that I was a part of this book’s history and it’s shared, communal experience exposed by curly-Q handwritten names and room assignments revealing repeat customers devouring the book beyond it’s deadline. An act of declaration that’s dissolving faster than we can see as cards are removed permanently and bar codes take their place.

The Japanese term “wabi-sabi” is described as the art of finding beauty in imperfection and of accepting the natural cycle of growth, decay and death. But unlike the American culture focused on spectacle, wabi-sabi is underplayed and modest, the kind of undeclared beauty that waits patiently to be discovered. It’s found in time-worn faces of expired library books that have traveled through many hands, and across county lines until they have reached their final resting place at ex-library warehouses where safe harbors are found in Costco-sized rows of “discards” and “withdrawns” rising within inches of the ceiling. 

The volumes documented in “Expired” serve as specimens akin to post-mortem photography in the Victorian Era when family members only received the honor of documentation upon their demise. Each picture serves as an homage calling out palpable echoes etched into the pages by a margin-scrawled note, a yellowed coffee splatter or sticky peanut butter and jelly fingerprints. It’s easy to feel a sense of abuse and loss, but they say much more. They show the evidence of everyone that has touched them, because they were well read, and often well loved. They were not left on shelves, untouched. Now they have a new life, as portraits of the unique shared experience found only in a library book. We must take time to celebrate the swiftly disappearing, unique communal experience offered by library books as it’s quickly replaced by downloads, finger screen-swipes and plastic newness. If you listen carefully you can hear the aching poetry calling from tattered pages that carry the burden of their years with dignity and grace.

Check our first post of Kerry Mansfield’s Expired.

(via jbrookspress)

Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it.
Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.

—William Faulkner (via quotes-shape-us)

(via literatureismyutopia)

amandaonwriting:

In 1992, prior to the release of Connie Willis' new novel, Doomsday Book,Random House editor Amy Stout approached multi-award winning - and notoriously blunt - science fiction author Harlan Ellison for a quote. The following letter was sent to Stout in reply and includes the blurb as requested, plus explicit instruction with regards to its use. To the eagle-eyed amongst you: yes, Ellison’s spelling mistake was bravely corrected.
Source: Letters of Note

I certainly, heartily, recommend Connie Willis’s writing especially To Say Nothing of the Dog. (Not that my recommendation is worth anything close to that above.)

amandaonwriting:

In 1992, prior to the release of Connie Willis' new novel, Doomsday Book,Random House editor Amy Stout approached multi-award winning - and notoriously blunt - science fiction author Harlan Ellison for a quote. The following letter was sent to Stout in reply and includes the blurb as requested, plus explicit instruction with regards to its use. To the eagle-eyed amongst you: yes, Ellison’s spelling mistake was bravely corrected.

Source: Letters of Note

I certainly, heartily, recommend Connie Willis’s writing especially To Say Nothing of the Dog. (Not that my recommendation is worth anything close to that above.)

vintageanchorbooks:

#tbt the days when Edward Gorey was an Art Editor for our paperbacks…

Edward Gorey 5ever!!

vintageanchorbooks:

#tbt the days when Edward Gorey was an Art Editor for our paperbacks…

Edward Gorey 5ever!!

anatomyofbibliomania:

From Tisch Library’s newly acquired copy of Der vorsichtige Speiss-Meister…Augsburg:Matthaus Riegers wel. Sohnen, 1776. [xvi], 454, [1] p. ; 8vo. Small woodcut on t.p., woodcut head- and tail-pieces. German cook book, first published in 1766, the author (Odilo Schreger) was a Benedictine prior, and wrote with a light touch.  

wnyc:

Rejection sucks. But most of the seminal figures in literature, art, and music, were rejected many times over before being accepted. 
Our pals at Word of Mouth have collected some of history’s dumbest rejection letters, from Gertrude Stein’s (above) to Nirvana’s, for some dramatic readings: 
http://wnyc.org/2C4Np

wnyc:

Rejection sucks. But most of the seminal figures in literature, art, and music, were rejected many times over before being accepted. 

Our pals at Word of Mouth have collected some of history’s dumbest rejection letters, from Gertrude Stein’s (above) to Nirvana’s, for some dramatic readings: 

http://wnyc.org/2C4Np