Exile Bibliophile

Adventures in Book Collecting
benjaminlclark:

****Paper Notebook that Syncs to Cloud****
I’ve been using *those* notebooks (you know the ones) for several years now … little ones as everyday carry for all the random stuff, and bigger ones as an appointment diary and a place to stick my fruit stickers. I love using notebooks, and they are indispensable to my creativity and productivity. But it’s not only the simple, analog process of pencil to paper. Occasionally, I pull old notebooks off the shelf to look for old ideas and new inspiration. Or just to enjoy the satisfaction of having a lovely stack of filled notebooks with the squiggles of my brain guano.
Enter Mod Notebooks — Paper and ink notebooks (that don’t cost all that much more than *those other* notebooks) and once it’s filled, you send your notebook to their idea fairy-archivists, and they scan it, sync it to your account on their app on your phone and VOILA — there it is! Mod will then return your notebook to you, or it can be recycled (*GASP/ CLUTCH AT THROAT*).
No more being away from your chicken scratch archive, no more saying “I know the name of that song, I wrote it down in my notebook last week [three years/ eleven notebooks ago] …”, etc. They claim the app also syncs with your favorite productivity computer thingy (Hooray for OneNote!). I didn’t know I wanted that feature until they offered.
Now if they’d just scan all my old notebooks ….
Okay, so not only is this a cool new thing I heard about, but Huckberry has a deal right now that’ll save us about $5 on this very good idea, so I for one am going to try it out.
(via Mod Notebook - Ruled | Huckberry)

benjaminlclark:

****Paper Notebook that Syncs to Cloud****

I’ve been using *those* notebooks (you know the ones) for several years now … little ones as everyday carry for all the random stuff, and bigger ones as an appointment diary and a place to stick my fruit stickers. I love using notebooks, and they are indispensable to my creativity and productivity. But it’s not only the simple, analog process of pencil to paper. Occasionally, I pull old notebooks off the shelf to look for old ideas and new inspiration. Or just to enjoy the satisfaction of having a lovely stack of filled notebooks with the squiggles of my brain guano.

Enter Mod Notebooks — Paper and ink notebooks (that don’t cost all that much more than *those other* notebooks) and once it’s filled, you send your notebook to their idea fairy-archivists, and they scan it, sync it to your account on their app on your phone and VOILA — there it is! Mod will then return your notebook to you, or it can be recycled (*GASP/ CLUTCH AT THROAT*).

No more being away from your chicken scratch archive, no more saying “I know the name of that song, I wrote it down in my notebook last week [three years/ eleven notebooks ago] …”, etc. They claim the app also syncs with your favorite productivity computer thingy (Hooray for OneNote!). I didn’t know I wanted that feature until they offered.

Now if they’d just scan all my old notebooks ….

Okay, so not only is this a cool new thing I heard about, but Huckberry has a deal right now that’ll save us about $5 on this very good idea, so I for one am going to try it out.

(via Mod Notebook - Ruled | Huckberry)

(via benjaminlclark)

FACT: If you love books, you should already be following Book Traces.

booktraces:

"… but [he] was a few minutes afterwards, killed in the vineyard immediately adjoining it. I trust that what I have written will prove sufficient for your purpose," writes the Confederate general officer Basil W. Duke to Chattanooga attorney, Charles McGuffey, in an account of the death of his brother-in-law, General John Hunt Morgan

As submitter Steve Cox writes, “This book is part of a collection of books given the university in the early 1950s by a local collector of Southern imprints, and who was noted for inserting items in her books, such as news clippings, letters, notes. Included in this is a carte de visite, pasted in of John Hunt Morgan, and tipped in the back is [the] 1916 letter … Unfortunately, the book was processed back in the day before rare and valuable books got any special treatment.”

Title: Reminiscences of General Basil W. Duke, C. S. A.
Author: Duke, Basil Wilson
Publication date: Garden City, 1911
Library: University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Call number: E470 .D89 1911
Submitted by: Steve Cox

[Read a rather gripping account of Morgan’s death here: Footnotes on the Death of John Morgan]

illustratedgentleman:

Old Heidelberg press #matthouston #gastowntattoo #traditional #tattoo #black

illustratedgentleman:

Old Heidelberg press #matthouston #gastowntattoo #traditional #tattoo #black

History/ Ghost Stories

History/ Ghost Stories

vintageanchorbooks:

“Maybe freedom really is nothing left to lose. You had it once in childhood, when it was okay to climb a tree, to paint a crazy picture and wipe out on your bike, to get hurt. The spirit of risk gradually takes its leave. It follows the wild cries of joy and pain down the wind, through the hedgerow, growing ever fainter. What was that sound? A dog barking far off? That was our life calling to us, the one that was vigorous and undefended and curious.”  ― from “Hell or High Water: Surviving Tibet’s Tsango River” by Peter Heller From the bestselling author of The Dog Stars, the true story of an elite kayaking team’s heroic conquest of the world’s last great adventure prize: Tibet’s Tsangpo River. The Tsangpo Gorge in southeastern Tibet has lured explorers and adventurers since its discovery. Sacred to the Buddhists, the inspiration for Shangri La, the Gorge is as steeped in legend and mystery as any spot on earth. As a river-running challenge, the remote Tsangpo is relentlessly unforgiving, more difficult than any stretch of river ever attempted. Its mysteries have withstood a century’s worth of determined efforts to explore it’s length. The finest expedition paddlers on earth have tried. Several have died. All have failed. Until now. In the heart of the Himalayan winter, a team of seven kayakers launched a meticulously planned assault of the Gorge. The paddlers were river cowboys, superstars in the universe of extreme kayaking. Accompanying them was author Peter Heller, a world-class kayaker in his own right. Filled with history, white-knuckle drama, and mutiny in one of the world’s most storied-and remote-locations, Hell or High Water is the riveting story of this adventure. More here: http://ow.ly/y6Eug

Although completely different by the sounds of it, Dog Stars is one of my most recommended books this past year. Looking forward to this one!

vintageanchorbooks:

“Maybe freedom really is nothing left to lose. You had it once in childhood, when it was okay to climb a tree, to paint a crazy picture and wipe out on your bike, to get hurt. The spirit of risk gradually takes its leave. It follows the wild cries of joy and pain down the wind, through the hedgerow, growing ever fainter. What was that sound? A dog barking far off? That was our life calling to us, the one that was vigorous and undefended and curious.”
― from “Hell or High Water: Surviving Tibet’s Tsango River” by Peter Heller

From the bestselling author of The Dog Stars, the true story of an elite kayaking team’s heroic conquest of the world’s last great adventure prize: Tibet’s Tsangpo River. The Tsangpo Gorge in southeastern Tibet has lured explorers and adventurers since its discovery. Sacred to the Buddhists, the inspiration for Shangri La, the Gorge is as steeped in legend and mystery as any spot on earth. As a river-running challenge, the remote Tsangpo is relentlessly unforgiving, more difficult than any stretch of river ever attempted. Its mysteries have withstood a century’s worth of determined efforts to explore it’s length. The finest expedition paddlers on earth have tried. Several have died. All have failed. Until now. In the heart of the Himalayan winter, a team of seven kayakers launched a meticulously planned assault of the Gorge. The paddlers were river cowboys, superstars in the universe of extreme kayaking. Accompanying them was author Peter Heller, a world-class kayaker in his own right. Filled with history, white-knuckle drama, and mutiny in one of the world’s most storied-and remote-locations, Hell or High Water is the riveting story of this adventure. More here: http://ow.ly/y6Eug

Although completely different by the sounds of it, Dog Stars is one of my most recommended books this past year. Looking forward to this one!

Expired by Kerry Mansfield

Statement:

In elementary school I spent many lost afternoons hiding in the library nook reading while settled deeply into a green vinyl beanbag chair surrounded by the scent of musty paper. The first rite of passage upon learning how to write one’s name was to inscribe it on a library check-out card promising the book’s safe journey and return. I remember reading the list of names that had come before me and cradling the feeling that I was a part of this book’s history and it’s shared, communal experience exposed by curly-Q handwritten names and room assignments revealing repeat customers devouring the book beyond it’s deadline. An act of declaration that’s dissolving faster than we can see as cards are removed permanently and bar codes take their place.

The Japanese term “wabi-sabi” is described as the art of finding beauty in imperfection and of accepting the natural cycle of growth, decay and death. But unlike the American culture focused on spectacle, wabi-sabi is underplayed and modest, the kind of undeclared beauty that waits patiently to be discovered. It’s found in time-worn faces of expired library books that have traveled through many hands, and across county lines until they have reached their final resting place at ex-library warehouses where safe harbors are found in Costco-sized rows of “discards” and “withdrawns” rising within inches of the ceiling. 

The volumes documented in “Expired” serve as specimens akin to post-mortem photography in the Victorian Era when family members only received the honor of documentation upon their demise. Each picture serves as an homage calling out palpable echoes etched into the pages by a margin-scrawled note, a yellowed coffee splatter or sticky peanut butter and jelly fingerprints. It’s easy to feel a sense of abuse and loss, but they say much more. They show the evidence of everyone that has touched them, because they were well read, and often well loved. They were not left on shelves, untouched. Now they have a new life, as portraits of the unique shared experience found only in a library book. We must take time to celebrate the swiftly disappearing, unique communal experience offered by library books as it’s quickly replaced by downloads, finger screen-swipes and plastic newness. If you listen carefully you can hear the aching poetry calling from tattered pages that carry the burden of their years with dignity and grace.

Check our first post of Kerry Mansfield’s Expired.

(via jbrookspress)